Status update : celebrity, publicity, and branding in the social media age.

By: Marwick, Alice Emily.
Material type: materialTypeLabelComputer filePublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, Description: 1 online resource (369 pages).ISBN: 9780300199154.Subject(s): Electronic books | Branding (Marketing) | Publicity | Celebrities | Social status | Social media | Web 2.0Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
A Cultural History of Web 2.0 -- Leaders and Followers : Status in the Tech Scene -- Fabulous Lives of Micro-Celebrities -- Self-Branding : The (Safe for Work) Self -- Lifestreaming : We Live in Public -- Designed in California : Entrepreneurship and the Myths of Web 2.0 -- Conclusion -- Appendix: Cast of Characters.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Web Resource Web Resource AUB Library
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E-Book Access available online
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

A Cultural History of Web 2.0 -- Leaders and Followers : Status in the Tech Scene -- Fabulous Lives of Micro-Celebrities -- Self-Branding : The (Safe for Work) Self -- Lifestreaming : We Live in Public -- Designed in California : Entrepreneurship and the Myths of Web 2.0 -- Conclusion -- Appendix: Cast of Characters.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Many people have already said much of what is said in this book. In fact, it seems a sort of summary follow-up to the history of the discussions about the social media inclinations of Silicon Valley, with its always on, always connected, self-branded approach to life. This seemingly minor contribution makes it a worthwhile book. But it goes one better. Marwick (communication and media studies, Fordham Univ.; formerly, postdoctoral researcher, Microsoft Research) both reports on these cultural assumptions that have become the norm in the IT industry and actively questions them. The end result is a description of a culture where anyone can succeed with a generous dose of initiative and a willingness to work and learn--at least as long as one is a capable white male who is willing to sacrifice the rest of his work-life balance for getting ahead. The book slings no serious mud, but takes a solidly female perspective on a sometimes openly misogynistic world that pats itself on the back for technological equality while actively discriminating against those who do not fit its patterns or want to play its games. And that perspective makes all the difference in the world. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. P. L. Kantor formerly, Southern Vermont College