Partnering dance and education : intelligent moves for changing times.

By: Hanna, Judith Lynne.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Champaign, Ill.; Leeds : Human Kinetics, c1999Description: xv, 255 p. : ill., port. ; 23 cm. (pbk).ISBN: 0880115114.Subject(s): Performing Arts | Dance-United States-Psychological aspects | Dance-Social aspects-United States | Interdisciplinary approach in education-United States | Dance-Study and teaching-United StatesDDC classification: 792.807HAN
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p><br> Dance education is at a critical juncture in the United States. Even though it has gained wide acceptance as a valuable educational discipline and has achieved such victories as inclusion in the National Education Goals, its future remains uncertain. Educational reform, budget cuts, and conflicting views on the relevance of arts education all bring into question how--and if--dance should be taught in our schools.</p> <p>In Partnering Dance and Education , Dr. Judith Lynne Hanna presents a compelling argument for making dance central to every student's education. She examines current trends and issues in education to show how dance can be successfully justified and taught in today's changing educational environment.</p> <p>Rich with examples from arts magnet schools, arts organization offerings, dance company programs, public school instruction, and programs for at-risk youth, the book addresses difficult questions, including:</p> <p>- Is dance education in and of itself worthwhile?<br> - What are the ways of providing dance education?<br> - Who should teach dance in public schools?<br> - Why and how should we connect dance to other bodies of knowledge?<br> - What can be learned in, about, and through dance?<br> - Does dance education benefit at-risk youth?<br> - Do we teach gender roles in dance education?<br> - What are the advantages and problems with cultural diversity in dance education?</p> <p>Divided into two parts, Partnering Dance and Education is full of information and insights that readers will find both illuminating and thought provoking.</p> <p>Part I recognizes dance as a discipline in its own right with a distinct body of knowledge. Chapters discuss the benefits and methods of providing dance education, ways dance education can develop within the education reform movement, and who should teach dance.</p> <p>Part II addresses how dance education, while meaningful in itself, has broader relevance. Chapters discuss how dance can be used to teach academic and workplace skills, help at-risk youth, promote national identity while preserving cultural diversity, and help people cope with stress. It explains how children's dance during free play can be used as a teaching tool, and it looks at the role of dance in teaching students about gender.</p> <p>A special appendix poses challenging discussion questions for students and teachers. An extensive dance resources appendix includes suggested readings, as well as the addresses and phone numbers of leading dance organizations, programs, and schools.<br></p>

Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-248) and index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgments (p. xiii)
  • Prelude (p. 1)
  • Why a Book on Dance Education? (p. 2)
  • You're the Audience (p. 3)
  • Itinerary (p. 4)
  • Part 1 Understanding Dance Education
  • Chapter 1 Is Dance a Distinct Body of Knowledge? (p. 9)
  • What Is Dance? (p. 10)
  • The Body in Space, in Time, and With Effort (p. 13)
  • Dance Involves the Senses and the Emotions (p. 13)
  • Dance Intelligence (p. 17)
  • Is Dance a Performing, Liberal, Physical, or Applied Art? (p. 26)
  • Potential Transfer of Dance Learning (p. 27)
  • Explicit Teaching to Promote Transfer of Dance Learning (p. 27)
  • Encore (p. 28)
  • Chapter 2 The Power of Dance Well Taught (p. 29)
  • What Are Some Potential Benefits of Dance Education? (p. 30)
  • History Reveals Potential of Dance Education (p. 30)
  • Anecdotal Reports (p. 32)
  • Research Evidence (p. 36)
  • What Are Some Key Ways of Providing Dance Education? (p. 40)
  • Preprofessional Training (p. 41)
  • Arts Magnet Schools (p. 42)
  • Arts Organization Offerings (p. 43)
  • Dance Company Programs (p. 44)
  • Other School Instruction in Dance (p. 45)
  • Encore (p. 47)
  • Chapter 3 Survival of Dance Education (p. 49)
  • What Is the Foundation for New Steps in Dance Education? (p. 50)
  • Setting the Stage (p. 50)
  • Creative Self-Expression and Pioneer Modern Dancers (p. 51)
  • European Thinkers-Practitioners (p. 54)
  • Dance Enters the U.S. Academic Setting (p. 55)
  • Other Scholars Stimulate Dance Education in America (p. 57)
  • Can Dance Education Develop Within the Education Reform Movement? (p. 58)
  • A Core Subject (p. 59)
  • Voluntary World-Class National Standards (p. 61)
  • Assessment (p. 63)
  • Opportunity-to-Learn Standards (p. 64)
  • Improving Teaching Methods (p. 65)
  • Business Concerns (p. 66)
  • Media and Cyberspace (p. 67)
  • Research Agenda (p. 67)
  • Encore (p. 68)
  • Chapter 4 Who Should Teach Dance? (p. 69)
  • How Do Professional Dance Companies Promote Dance Education? (p. 70)
  • A New Vision (p. 71)
  • Performance as Education (p. 72)
  • Artists in the Schools (p. 72)
  • Who Should Teach Dance in K-12 and Higher Education? (p. 75)
  • Competencies Needed (p. 75)
  • Preparing to Teach (p. 78)
  • State Department of Education Certification (p. 80)
  • Continuing Education (p. 82)
  • Independent Dance Schools and the Public Sector (p. 82)
  • Fear of Competition (p. 83)
  • Independent Dance School Opportunities (p. 84)
  • National Registry of Dance Educators (p. 85)
  • Encore (p. 86)
  • Part 11 Learning in, About, and Through Dance
  • Chapter 5 Teaching Academic, Citizenship, and Workplace Skills Through Dance (p. 89)
  • Why Connect Dance to Other Knowledge and Skills? (p. 90)
  • What Are Some Types of Dance Connections? (p. 91)
  • Promoting Cognitive Learning Through Dance (p. 91)
  • Teaching Dance as a Social Art (p. 96)
  • Fostering Personal Development (p. 98)
  • Developing Citizenship Responsibility (p. 100)
  • Encouraging Aesthetic Appreciation (p. 103)
  • Catalyzing Business Creativity (p. 104)
  • How Can Dance Be a Discipline and Be Interdisciplinary? (p. 104)
  • Minnesota Center for Arts Education High School (p. 104)
  • Roger Williams Middle School Dance Program (p. 106)
  • Encore (p. 107)
  • Chapter 6 Dance Education for At-Risk Youth (p. 109)
  • Why Have Dance Education for At-Risk Youth? (p. 110)
  • National Dance Institute (NDI) (p. 112)
  • NDI's Mission (p. 112)
  • Students Served (p. 113)
  • Activities (p. 113)
  • Staff (p. 115)
  • Collaboration With the Schools (p. 115)
  • Special Programs (p. 116)
  • Success (p. 116)
  • Learning to Read Through the Arts (LTRTA) (p. 118)
  • Dance and Remediation (p. 118)
  • Academic Achievement (p. 119)
  • Program Adoption (p. 119)
  • ArtsConnection Young Talent Dance Program (p. 120)
  • Student Selection (p. 120)
  • Content and Emphases (p. 121)
  • Discipline (p. 122)
  • Evaluation and Tutoring (p. 122)
  • Special Services (p. 123)
  • AileyCamp (p. 123)
  • A Child's Needs (p. 124)
  • Selection of At-Risk Youth (p. 125)
  • Activities (p. 125)
  • Assessment Methods (p. 127)
  • Student Experience (p. 127)
  • Teacher Experience (p. 128)
  • Lessons Learned (p. 129)
  • Encore (p. 130)
  • Chapter 7 Children's Dance at Play as a Teaching Tool (p. 133)
  • How Do Children's Own Dances at Play Contribute to Schooling? (p. 134)
  • Using Dance at Play as a Diagnostic Tool (p. 135)
  • Using Dance at Play as a Knowledge Baseline (p. 135)
  • What Did I Learn About Dance at Play in an Elementary School? (p. 135)
  • Historical Context (p. 135)
  • Dance as a Way to Express Identity on the Playground (p. 137)
  • Dance as a Challenge to Classroom Authority (p. 139)
  • Dance as Self-Expression in the Halls (p. 140)
  • Encore (p. 141)
  • Chapter 8 National Identity and Cultural Diversity in Dance Education (p. 143)
  • How Can Dance Reflect One's National Identity? (p. 144)
  • Dance Mirrors a Nation's Motto (p. 144)
  • Dances Become a Nation's Emissaries (p. 145)
  • What Are the Values of Cultural Diversity in Dance Education? (p. 147)
  • Understanding Others (p. 148)
  • Understanding One's Self (p. 148)
  • Choreographic Inspiration (p. 149)
  • Other Benefits (p. 149)
  • Are There Problems With Cultural Diversity in Dance Education? (p. 149)
  • Selecting Cultures or Dances to Emphasize (p. 150)
  • Lack of Evidence That Multicultural Programs Work (p. 151)
  • Threat to Social Mobility (p. 152)
  • Appropriation of Another's Culture (p. 152)
  • Embarrassment (p. 153)
  • How Can We Solve Problems of Cultural Diversity in Dance Education? (p. 153)
  • Investigate Sensitivities and Complexities (p. 154)
  • Balance Assimilation With Diversity (p. 154)
  • Evaluate (p. 154)
  • Encore (p. 155)
  • Chapter 9 Dance Education and Gender (p. 157)
  • Do We Learn Gender Through Dance? (p. 158)
  • Do We Teach Sex Roles in Education? (p. 159)
  • What Does History Tell Us About Gender in Dance? (p. 160)
  • Changing Gender Images in Dance (p. 160)
  • Respectability of Dance as a Career (p. 161)
  • What Are the Implications of Gender Roles in the Dance Classroom? (p. 162)
  • Nature's Contribution to Gender in Dance (p. 163)
  • Teachers' Contributions to Gender in Dance (p. 164)
  • Balancing Nostalgia with Relevance (p. 165)
  • Encore (p. 165)
  • Chapter 10 Dance Education and Stress (p. 167)
  • What Is Stress? (p. 168)
  • How Do We Cope With Stress Through Dance? (p. 170)
  • Dance as a Stress Inoculation (p. 170)
  • Escape (p. 171)
  • Mastery (p. 171)
  • Confronting Stressors in a Safe Environment (p. 172)
  • Can Dance Induce Stress? (p. 173)
  • Teaching Practices (p. 174)
  • Teacher Stress (p. 175)
  • Parent-, Self-, and Competition-Induced Stress (p. 175)
  • Stage Fright (p. 177)
  • Sexual Harassment and Parity (p. 177)
  • Can We Avoid Stress in Dance and Dance Education? (p. 178)
  • Physical Factors (p. 178)
  • Psychological and Genetic Factors (p. 179)
  • Being Prepared (p. 180)
  • Encore (p. 180)
  • Finale: Overcoming Obstacles and Moving Forward (p. 183)
  • Key Issues in Dance Education (p. 184)
  • How Do Power and Ideology Affect Dance Education? (p. 184)
  • Money (p. 185)
  • Censorship (p. 185)
  • Image (p. 186)
  • Can We Surmount Hurdles to Successful Dance Education? (p. 188)
  • Funding and Partnerships (p. 189)
  • Research and New Steps (p. 191)
  • Deep Plie: Get Ready to Soar (p. 194)
  • Appendix 1 Discussion Questions (p. 195)
  • Appendix 2 Outline of National Dance Education Standards (p. 199)
  • Appendix 3 Dance Education Resources (p. 210)
  • References and Suggested Readings (p. 225)
  • Index (p. 249)
  • About the Author (p. 255)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Combining a rich and diverse dance background with the understanding of an academic, Hanna (Univ. of Maryland) provides a unique and insightful view of dance in the context of education and life. Organized around themes salient to all dance educators, she presents information in a compartmentalized format that results in sections that are of value when read independently from the others as well as in the order provided. With an eye toward potential opportunities available in a reform-minded environment, the author directly explores the multidimensional aspects of dance education and the many ways in which it can enhance the educational experiences of youth and adults. In addition to addressing the value of dance in the psychomotor domain, the text presents compelling discussions related to its value in the affective, emotional, and sociocultural domains. Discussion questions provided for each chapter serve as an excellent resource for faculty who are teaching courses designed for dance majors. In addition, after presenting many potential obstacles to dance education achieving its full potential, Hanna concludes on a positive note with recommendations intended to move dance education forward. Readable at any level. B. S. Shifflett San Jose State University