Blink : the power of thinking without thinking.

By: Gladwell, Malcolm, 1963-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Back Bay Books, 2007Description: xii, 296, 15, 11 p. : ill. ; 21 cm. (pbk).ISBN: 9780316010665.Subject(s): Philosophy and Psychology | Intuition | Decision makingDDC classification: 153.4GLA
Contents:
The statue that didn't look right -- The theory of thin slices : how a little bit of knowledge goes a long way -- The locked door : the secret life of snap decisions -- The Warren Harding error : why we fall for tall, dark, and handsome men -- Paul Van Riper's big victory : creating structure for spontaneity -- Kenna's dilemma : the right-and wrong-way to ask people what they want -- Seven seconds in the Bronx : the delicate art of mind-reading -- Conclusion: listening with your eyes : the lessons of blink.
Summary: How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.
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Book 153.4 GLA (Browse shelf) Checked out 02/10/2020 D02563
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The landmark book that has revolutionized the way we understand leadership and decision making -- from #1 bestselling author Malcolm Gladwell. <br> <br> In his breakthrough bestseller The Tipping Point , Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink , he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. <br> Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work--in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? <br> In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple; the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball; the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. Here, too, are great failures of "blink": the election of Warren Harding; "New Coke"; and the shooting of Amadou Diallo by police. <br> Blink reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of "thin-slicing"--filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The statue that didn't look right -- The theory of thin slices : how a little bit of knowledge goes a long way -- The locked door : the secret life of snap decisions -- The Warren Harding error : why we fall for tall, dark, and handsome men -- Paul Van Riper's big victory : creating structure for spontaneity -- Kenna's dilemma : the right-and wrong-way to ask people what they want -- Seven seconds in the Bronx : the delicate art of mind-reading -- Conclusion: listening with your eyes : the lessons of blink.

How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Though it is interesting and well written, Gladwell's book on first impressions leaves the academic reader with more questions than answers. In and of itself, this is mere quibble; the problem is that Gladwell makes several significant claims but fails to support them. He offers anecdotal evidence but does not cite the experimental data in a way that allows the reader to determine the validity of his interpretations. For example, he contends that snap decisions can be either incredibly accurate or tragically wrong, but the quotations he offers in support of this idea, though fascinating, are not convincing. Further, he offers two main reasons for distortions of snap decisions: emotional arousal and time pressure. Scientific studies demonstrate that emotional arousal and, more important, events threatening to the self would lead to delayed reactions and that events related to activated need states would lead to major distortions in snap decisions. This book certainly deserves a place on The New York Times best-seller list because Gladwell raises an important question. Its usefulness in an academic setting is questionable, given all the above. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Comprehensive academic collections; public libraries. M. W. York University of New Haven