Brilliant effects : a cultural history of gem stones and jewellery.

By: Pointon, Marcia.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Haven, CT : Yale University Press, 2009Description: ix, 426 p. : ill. ; 31 cm.ISBN: 9780300142785.Subject(s): Jewellery and Metalcrafts | Cultural aspects | Social aspects | Jewellery making | Jewellery design | JewelleryDDC classification: 739.27POI
Contents:
Introduction -- 1. Fault lines and points of light -- 2. 'A fine brilliant glittering on the little finger' -- 3. Jewel boxes in pictorial narratives -- 4. 'Something rich and strange' -- 5. Marie Antoinette and the diamond necklace affair -- 6. Charlotte of England, Warren Hastings, and the dangers of diamonds -- 7. Chinese whispers : James Cox's Jewellery Museum-London in the 1770s -- 8. Toys and automata : Jaquet-Droz and Leschot-Neuchâtel, Paris, London in the 1780s -- 9. The Treasury of the Santa Casa at Loreto and its English visitors -- 10. Secular memorials : mourning and memory in hair jewellery -- 11. Lapidary loves -- 12. Crystalline terminations -- Bibliography.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
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Library
Book 739.27 POI (Browse shelf) Available F00599
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>In a broad-ranging and exceptional work of cultural and art history, Marcia Pointon explores what owning, wearing, distributing, and circulating gems and jewelry has meant in the post-Renaissance history of Europe. She examines the capacity of jewels not only to fascinate but also to create disorder and controversy throughout history and across cultures.</p> <p>Pointon argues that what is materially precious is invariably contentious. When what is precious is a finely crafted artifact made from hard-won imported materials, the stakes become particularly high--evidenced, for example, by the political fallout from Marie-Antoinette's implication in the affair of the stolen diamond necklace. Prodigiously rich in its range of reference and truly interdisciplinary in its approach, this book challenges the reader to reassess the importance of material things as powerful agents in human relations and in visual and verbal representation.</p>

Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- 1. Fault lines and points of light -- 2. 'A fine brilliant glittering on the little finger' -- 3. Jewel boxes in pictorial narratives -- 4. 'Something rich and strange' -- 5. Marie Antoinette and the diamond necklace affair -- 6. Charlotte of England, Warren Hastings, and the dangers of diamonds -- 7. Chinese whispers : James Cox's Jewellery Museum-London in the 1770s -- 8. Toys and automata : Jaquet-Droz and Leschot-Neuchâtel, Paris, London in the 1780s -- 9. The Treasury of the Santa Casa at Loreto and its English visitors -- 10. Secular memorials : mourning and memory in hair jewellery -- 11. Lapidary loves -- 12. Crystalline terminations -- Bibliography.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pointon (emer., Manchester Univ., UK), the author of this lavish production with its outstanding color plates and details, views jewelry as an "agent" in history and the visual arts. Her themes are the artifact's relationship with concept, "ideological content," jewelry as communication, and the interaction of jewelry with culture. The objects she considers generate new meanings. She finds that precious materials create statements about makers and wearers, thereby revealing political and cultural messages. She considers jewels, gemstones and crystals, alone and in settings, and automata, along with natural items and collections. To understand meanings through jewelry, Pointon moves across disciplines fluidly and ranges through Western art history from antiquity to contemporary times. She discusses broad issues first and then "micro-histories," with a focus on France and England and one incursion to Italy. Each of the 12 long essays could stand alone. The author's detailed research is evident in extensive notes and bibliography. Pointon's scholarly research findings are insightful, as is her challenging yet fascinating writing. This volume will be useful for the author's interpretive methodology, for material culture study, and for art history and psychology of jewelry studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students and researchers/faculty. W. L. Whitwell formerly, Hollins College